Laboratory for Molecular Diagnostics
Center for Nephrology and Metabolic Disorders

Wilms tumor

Wilms tumor is a common kidney tumor in children that comprises three cell types blastemal, stromal, and epithelial cells. It occurs predominantly unilateral, but also bilateral and multifocal.

Epidemiology

Wilms tumors account for about 6% of childhood malignancies. Girls are slightly more frequently affected. The total incidence is 7 cases per million children younger than 15 years.

Diagnosis

The tumor itself is best diagnosed by ultrasound but congenital genitourinary malformations, hermaphroditism or kidney dysfunction should raise awareness of a tumor disposition and may encourage genetic diagnosis.

Pathogenesis

This disease is partly caused by congenital syndromes due to germline mutations of the WT1 oder WT2. Other gene possibly involved are p53, FWT1, or FWT2.

The important role of the WT1 gene in tomorgenesis illustrates the fact that in some tumors somatic mutations can be identified. Also patients with heterozygous germline mutations often show homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in their tumor cells, providing support for a second hit hypothesis.

Systematic

Hereditary renal tumors
Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer
Hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma
Nonpapillary renal cell carcinoma
Wilms tumor
Aniridia-Wilms-tumor syndrome
PAX6
WT1
Denys-Drash syndrome
WT1
Somatic nephroblastoma
GPC3
WT1
WAGR syndrome
PAX6
WT1
von Hippel-Lindau syndrome

References:

1.

Zuppan CW et al. (1988) Anaplasia in unilateral Wilms' tumor: a report from the National Wilms' Tumor Study Pathology Center.

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2.

Coppes MJ et al. (1994) Genetic events in the development of Wilms' tumor.

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3.

Grovas A et al. (1997) The National Cancer Data Base report on patterns of childhood cancers in the United States.

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4.

Orphanet article

Orphanet ID 654 [^]
5.

OMIM.ORG article

Omim 194070 [^]
6.

Wikipedia article

Wikipedia EN (Wilms's_tumor) [^]
Update: May 10, 2019