Molekulargenetische Diagnostik
Praxis Dr. Mato Nagel

Spätmanifeste Adipositas

Die spätmanifeste Adipositas wird durch dominante Mutationen im AGRP-Gen hervorgerufen.

Gliederung

Fettleibigkeit
Autosomal dominante Adipositas
BMI-beeinflussender genetischer Faktor
Frühzeitig einsetzende Adipositas
Neigung zu Fettleibigkeit
Schwere Fettsucht
Schwere Fettsucht mit Typ 2 Diabetes
Spätmanifeste Adipositas
AGRP

Referenzen:

1.

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2.

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3.

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4.

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5.

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6.

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7.

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8.

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9.

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44.

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45.

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46.

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47.

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48.

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