Molekulargenetische Diagnostik
Praxis Dr. Mato Nagel

Kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit gestörter LDL-Clearance

Gliederung

Familiäre kombinierte Hyperlipämie
Kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit Dysfunktion des Fettgewebes
Kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit VLDL-Überproduktion
Kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit gestörtem VLDL-Metabolismus
Kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit gestörter LDL-Clearance
ATF6
LDLR
PCSK9

Referenzen:

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43.

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44.

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45.

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46.

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56.

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59.

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60.

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61.

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64.

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68.

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76.

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78.

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85.

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133.

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