Molekulargenetische Diagnostik
Praxis Dr. Mato Nagel

Masern-Infektanfälligkeit

Es gibt genetische Faktoren, die Masern-infektionen beeinflussen können. Solche genetischen Faktoren können sowohl eine erhöhte Anfälligkeit, aber auch eine Resistenz bewirken. Manche haben Einfluss auf das Ergebnis einer Immunisierung (Impfung).

Gliederung

Erbliche Infektionsanfälligkeiten
HIV-Resistenz
Masern-Infektanfälligkeit
CD46
Meningokokken-Infektanfälligkeit
Resistenz gegenüber Trypanosoma brucei
Störungen der mRNA-Editiertfunktion

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