Molekulargenetische Diagnostik
Praxis Dr. Mato Nagel

Erbliche Erkrankungen mit heterotroper Knochenbildung

Erbliche Erkrankungen mit heterotroper Knochenbildung ist eine Gruppe von erkrankungen, wo sich normales Knowchengewebe außerhalb des Skelettes bildet. Meist ist zudem das Körperskelett deformiert.

Gliederung

Erbliche Knochenerkrankungen
Erbliche Erkrankungen mit heterotroper Knochenbildung
Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva
ACVR1
Hyperphosphatämische familiäre Tumorcalcinose
FGF23
GALNT3
KL
Progressive knöcherne Heteroplasie
GNAS
Hereditäre Rachitis
Knochendysplasie
Osteopetrose
Osteoporose
Parodontales Ehlers-Danlos-Syndrom
Pseudohypoparathyreoidismus

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2.

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3.

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4.

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41.

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43.

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44.

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