Molekulargenetische Diagnostik
Praxis Dr. Mato Nagel

Erbliche Bronchial- und Lungenerkrankungen

Die große Gruppe hereditärer broncho-pulmonaler Erkrankungen umfasst die verschiedenensten Störungen des Zellstoffwechsels und der Membranfunktion, aber auch Fehlfunktionen im Muskel- und Skelettsystem wirken sich nachteilig auf die Lungenfunktion aus.

Gliederung

Genetisch bedingte Erkrankungen
Erbliche Augenerkrankungen und Sehstörungen
Erbliche Blutkrankheiten und Gerinnungsstörungen
Erbliche Bronchial- und Lungenerkrankungen
Bronchiektasien mit und ohne erhöhtem Chlorid im Schweiß
Bronchiektasien mit und ohne erhöhtem Chlorid im Schweiß 1
SCNN1B
Bronchiektasien mit und ohne erhöhtem Chlorid im Schweiß 2
SCNN1A
Bronchiektasien mit und ohne erhöhtem Chlorid im Schweiß 3
SCNN1G
Cystinose
CTNS
Hereditäre pulmonale Embolie
Venöse thromboembolische Erkrankungen
Autosomal dominanter Protein C-Mangel
PROC
Autosomal dominanter Protein S-Mangel
PROS1
Autosomal rezessiver Protein C-Mangel
PROC
Autosomal rezessiver Protein S-Mangel
PROS1
F2
F5
HABP2
MTHFR
PAI-Transkriptionsmodulator
SERPINE1
Protein Z-Mangel
PROZ
SERPINA10
SERPINC1
THBD
VKORC1
Morbus Fabry
GLA
Neigung zu nächtlichem Asthma
ADRB2
Pulmonale alveoläre Mikrolithiasis
SLC34A2
Vermindertes Ansprechen auf beta-2-Mimetika
ADRB2
Erbliche Gefäßerkrankungen
Erbliche Infektionsanfälligkeiten
Erbliche Knochenerkrankungen
Erbliche Lebererkrankungen
Erbliche Nervenerkrankungen
Erbliche Nierenerkrankungen
Erbliche Pankreaserkrankungen
Erbliche Stoffwechselerkrankungen
Erbliche endokrinologische Erkrankungen
Erbliche immunologische Erkrankungen
Erblicher Bluthochdruck
Hereditäre Herzerkrankungen

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252.

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253.

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254.

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