Molekulargenetisches Labor
Zentrum für Nephrologie und Stoffwechsel
Moldiag Erkrankungen Gene Support Kontakt

Interleukin 10

Das IL10-Gen kodiert ein Zytokin, das Interleukin 10, welches in verschiedene Prozesse der Immunregulation involviert ist. Mutationen führen zum IL10-Mangel, der sich in verschiedenen Störungen manifestieren kann. So wird die Progression von rheumatoider Arthritis, die Anfälligkeit für HIV-Infektionen und die graft-versus-host-reaction beeinflusst.

Gentests:

Klinisch Untersuchungsmethoden Familienuntersuchung
Bearbeitungszeit 5 Tage
Probentyp genomische DNS
Klinisch Untersuchungsmethoden Hochdurchsatz-Sequenzierung
Bearbeitungszeit 25 Tage
Probentyp genomische DNS
Forschung Untersuchungsmethoden Direkte Sequenzierung der proteinkodierenden Bereiche eines Gens
Bearbeitungszeit 25 Tage
Probentyp genomische DNS

Verknüpfte Erkrankungen:

Schutz vor Graft-versus-host-disease
IL10
HIV 1-Infektionsanfälligkeit
IL10
Suszeptibilität für Rheumatoide Arthritis
IL10
PTPN22
Interleukin 10-Mangel
HIV 1-Infektionsanfälligkeit
IL10
IL10
Schutz vor Graft-versus-host-disease
IL10
Suszeptibilität für Rheumatoide Arthritis
IL10
PTPN22

Referenzen:

1.

Mazmanian SK et. al. (2008) A microbial symbiosis factor prevents intestinal inflammatory disease.

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2.

Lard LR et. al. (2003) Association of the -2849 interleukin-10 promoter polymorphism with autoantibody production and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis.

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3.

Singh UP et. al. (2003) Inhibition of IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 abrogates colitis in IL-10-/- mice.

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4.

Opdal SH et. al. (2003) IL-10 gene polymorphisms are associated with infectious cause of sudden infant death.

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5.

Cooke KR et. al. (2003) A protective gene for graft-versus-host disease.

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6.

Lin MT et. al. (2003) Relation of an interleukin-10 promoter polymorphism to graft-versus-host disease and survival after hematopoietic-cell transplantation.

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7.

Moraes MO et. al. (2004) Interleukin-10 promoter single-nucleotide polymorphisms as markers for disease susceptibility and disease severity in leprosy.

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8.

Lio D et. al. (2004) Opposite effects of interleukin 10 common gene polymorphisms in cardiovascular diseases and in successful ageing: genetic background of male centenarians is protective against coronary heart disease.

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9.

Ma CS et al. (2005) Impaired humoral immunity in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is associated with defective IL-10 production by CD4+ T cells.

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10.

Fowler EV et al. (2005) TNFalpha and IL10 SNPs act together to predict disease behaviour in Crohn's disease.

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11.

Malhotra D et. al. (2005) IL-10 promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms are significantly associated with resistance to leprosy.

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12.

Froicu M et. al. (2006) Vitamin D receptor is required to control gastrointestinal immunity in IL-10 knockout mice.

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13.

Brooks DG et. al. (2006) Interleukin-10 determines viral clearance or persistence in vivo.

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14.

Stein CM et al. (2007) Linkage and association analysis of candidate genes for TB and TNFalpha cytokine expression: evidence for association with IFNGR1, IL-10, and TNF receptor 1 genes.

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15.

Cassoux N et. al. (2007) IL-10 measurement in aqueous humor for screening patients with suspicion of primary intraocular lymphoma.

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16.

Natividad A et. al. (2008) Susceptibility to sequelae of human ocular chlamydial infection associated with allelic variation in IL10 cis-regulation.

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17.

Kim JM et. al. (1992) Structure of the mouse IL-10 gene and chromosomal localization of the mouse and human genes.

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18.

Ouma C et. al. (2008) Haplotypes of IL-10 promoter variants are associated with susceptibility to severe malarial anemia and functional changes in IL-10 production.

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19.

Dardalhon V et. al. (2008) IL-4 inhibits TGF-beta-induced Foxp3+ T cells and, together with TGF-beta, generates IL-9+ IL-10+ Foxp3(-) effector T cells.

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20.

Németh K et. al. (2009) Bone marrow stromal cells attenuate sepsis via prostaglandin E(2)-dependent reprogramming of host macrophages to increase their interleukin-10 production.

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21.

Sun J et. al. (2009) Effector T cells control lung inflammation during acute influenza virus infection by producing IL-10.

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22.

Said EA et. al. (2010) Programmed death-1-induced interleukin-10 production by monocytes impairs CD4+ T cell activation during HIV infection.

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23.

Villalta SA et. al. (2011) Interleukin-10 reduces the pathology of mdx muscular dystrophy by deactivating M1 macrophages and modulating macrophage phenotype.

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24.

Kane M et. al. (2011) Successful transmission of a retrovirus depends on the commensal microbiota.

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25.

Devkota S et. al. (2012) Dietary-fat-induced taurocholic acid promotes pathobiont expansion and colitis in Il10-/- mice.

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26.

Teles RM et al. (2013) Type I interferon suppresses type II interferon-triggered human anti-mycobacterial responses.

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27.

Olszak T et. al. (2014) Protective mucosal immunity mediated by epithelial CD1d and IL-10.

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28.

Zigmond E et. al. (2014) Macrophage-restricted interleukin-10 receptor deficiency, but not IL-10 deficiency, causes severe spontaneous colitis.

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29.

Kabat AM et. al. (2017) Inflammation by way of macrophage metabolism.

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30.

Ip WKE et. al. (2017) Anti-inflammatory effect of IL-10 mediated by metabolic reprogramming of macrophages.

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31.

Tanaka S et. al. (2018) Trim33 mediates the proinflammatory function of Th17 cells.

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32.

Esposito K et. al. (2003) Association of low interleukin-10 levels with the metabolic syndrome in obese women.

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33.

Kemper C et al. (2003) Activation of human CD4+ cells with CD3 and CD46 induces a T-regulatory cell 1 phenotype.

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34.

Vieira P et. al. (1991) Isolation and expression of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor cDNA clones: homology to Epstein-Barr virus open reading frame BCRFI.

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35.

Cox DR et. al. (1990) Radiation hybrid mapping: a somatic cell genetic method for constructing high-resolution maps of mammalian chromosomes.

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36.

Chan CC et. al. (1995) Interleukin-10 in the vitreous of patients with primary intraocular lymphoma.

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37.

Kühn R et. al. (1993) Interleukin-10-deficient mice develop chronic enterocolitis.

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38.

Crawley JB et. al. (1996) Interleukin-10 stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and p70 S6 kinase is required for the proliferative but not the antiinflammatory effects of the cytokine.

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39.

Turner DM et. al. (1997) An investigation of polymorphism in the interleukin-10 gene promoter.

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40.

Westendorp RG et. al. (1997) Genetic influence on cytokine production and fatal meningococcal disease.

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41.

Eskdale J et. al. (1997) Mapping of the human IL10 gene and further characterization of the 5' flanking sequence.

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42.

Rosenwasser LJ et. al. (1997) Genetics of atopy and asthma: the rationale behind promoter-based candidate gene studies (IL-4 and IL-10).

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43.

Gesser B et. al. (1997) Identification of functional domains on human interleukin 10.

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44.

Meng X et. al. (1998) Keratinocyte gene therapy for systemic diseases. Circulating interleukin 10 released from gene-transferred keratinocytes inhibits contact hypersensitivity at distant areas of the skin.

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45.

Eskdale J et. al. (1998) Interleukin 10 secretion in relation to human IL-10 locus haplotypes.

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46.

Franchimont D et al. (1999) Tumor necrosis factor alpha decreases, and interleukin-10 increases, the sensitivity of human monocytes to dexamethasone: potential regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor.

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47.

None (1999) IL-10: An "immunologic scalpel" for atherosclerosis?

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48.

Pinderski Oslund LJ et. al. (1999) Interleukin-10 blocks atherosclerotic events in vitro and in vivo.

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49.

Grove J et. al. (2000) Interleukin 10 promoter region polymorphisms and susceptibility to advanced alcoholic liver disease.

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50.

Kitagawa N et. al. (2000) Epstein-Barr virus-encoded poly(A)(-) RNA supports Burkitt's lymphoma growth through interleukin-10 induction.

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51.

Shin HD et. al. (2000) Genetic restriction of HIV-1 pathogenesis to AIDS by promoter alleles of IL10.

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52.

Summers AM et. al. (2000) Association of IL-10 genotype with sudden infant death syndrome.

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53.

Gibson AW et. al. (2001) Novel single nucleotide polymorphisms in the distal IL-10 promoter affect IL-10 production and enhance the risk of systemic lupus erythematosus.

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54.

Asadullah K et al. (2001) Interleukin-10 promoter polymorphism in psoriasis.

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55.

Farmer MA et. al. (2001) A major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 3 controls colitis severity in IL-10-deficient mice.

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56.

Goudy K et. al. (2001) Adeno-associated virus vector-mediated IL-10 gene delivery prevents type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

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57.

Lee TS et. al. (2002) Heme oxygenase-1 mediates the anti-inflammatory effect of interleukin-10 in mice.

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58.

Lee CG et. al. (2002) Transgenic overexpression of interleukin (IL)-10 in the lung causes mucus metaplasia, tissue inflammation, and airway remodeling via IL-13-dependent and -independent pathways.

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59.

Akbari O et. al. (2002) Antigen-specific regulatory T cells develop via the ICOS-ICOS-ligand pathway and inhibit allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity.

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60.

Alamartine E et. al. (2003) Interleukin-10 promoter polymorphisms and susceptibility to skin squamous cell carcinoma after renal transplantation.

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61.

Shin HD et. al. (2003) Interleukin 10 haplotype associated with increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma.

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62.
Update: 14. August 2020
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