Molekulargenetisches Labor
Zentrum für Nephrologie und Stoffwechsel
Moldiag Erkrankungen Gene Support Kontakt

Psoriasis-Veranlagung 1

Die Veranlagung für Psoriasis lässt sich an verschiedenen Loci des Genoms festmachen. Der Typ 1 ist mit dem HLA-C verbunden. Hier ist es insbesondere das HLA-Cw6-Allel, welches zu Psoriasis prädisponiert.

Gliederung

Psoriasis
CARD14 assoziierte Psoriasis
Psoriasis 14
Psoriasis 15
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 1
HLA-C
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 10
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 11
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 12
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 13
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 3
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 4
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 5
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 6
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 7
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 8
Psoriasis-Veranlagung 9

Referenzen:

1.

Balendran N et al. (1999) Characterization of the major susceptibility region for psoriasis at chromosome 6p21.3.

external link
2.

Asumalahti K et al. (2002) Coding haplotype analysis supports HCR as the putative susceptibility gene for psoriasis at the MHC PSORS1 locus.

external link
3.

Reich K et al. (2002) Promoter polymorphisms of the genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta are associated with different subtypes of psoriasis characterized by early and late disease onset.

external link
4.

Gudjónsson JE et al. (2002) HLA-Cw6-positive and HLA-Cw6-negative patients with Psoriasis vulgaris have distinct clinical features.

external link
5.

Schmitt-Egenolf M et al. (2001) Comparative association analysis reveals that corneodesmosin is more closely associated with psoriasis than HLA-Cw*0602-B*5701 in German families.

external link
6.

O'Brien KP et al. (2001) The HCR gene on 6p21 is unlikely to be a psoriasis susceptibility gene.

external link
7.

Mallon E et al. (2000) HLA-C and guttate psoriasis.

external link
8.

Gonzalez S et al. (2000) The OTF3 gene polymorphism confers susceptibility to psoriasis independent of the association of HLA-Cw*0602.

external link
9.

Asumalahti K et al. (2000) A candidate gene for psoriasis near HLA-C, HCR (Pg8), is highly polymorphic with a disease-associated susceptibility allele.

external link
10.

Nair RP et al. (2000) Localization of psoriasis-susceptibility locus PSORS1 to a 60-kb interval telomeric to HLA-C.

external link
11.

Oka A et al. (1999) Association analysis using refined microsatellite markers localizes a susceptibility locus for psoriasis vulgaris within a 111 kb segment telomeric to the HLA-C gene.

external link
12.

Veal CD et al. (2002) Family-based analysis using a dense single-nucleotide polymorphism-based map defines genetic variation at PSORS1, the major psoriasis-susceptibility locus.

external link
13.

Tazi Ahnini R et al. (1999) Novel genetic association between the corneodesmosin (MHC S) gene and susceptibility to psoriasis.

external link
14.

Leder RO et al. (1999) Psoriasis linkage in the HLA region.

external link
15.

Leder RO et al. () Familial psoriasis and HLA-B: unambiguous support for linkage in 97 published families.

external link
16.

Jenisch S et al. (1998) Linkage analysis of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) markers in familial psoriasis: strong disequilibrium effects provide evidence for a major determinant in the HLA-B/-C region.

external link
17.

Burden AD et al. (1998) Genetics of psoriasis: paternal inheritance and a locus on chromosome 6p.

external link
18.

Swanbeck G et al. (1997) Genetic counselling in psoriasis: empirical data on psoriasis among first-degree relatives of 3095 psoriatic probands.

external link
19.

Trembath RC et al. (1997) Identification of a major susceptibility locus on chromosome 6p and evidence for further disease loci revealed by a two stage genome-wide search in psoriasis.

external link
20.

Schmitt-Egenolf M et al. (1996) Familial juvenile onset psoriasis is associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I side of the extended haplotype Cw6-B57-DRB1*0701-DQA1*0201-DQB1*0303: a population- and family-based study.

external link
21.

Chen ML et al. (1996) Induction of vitamin D receptor mRNA expression in psoriatic plaques correlates with clinical response to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

external link
22.

Lowes MA et al. (2005) Increase in TNF-alpha and inducible nitric oxide synthase-expressing dendritic cells in psoriasis and reduction with efalizumab (anti-CD11a).

external link
23.

Kopp T et al. (2015) Clinical improvement in psoriasis with specific targeting of interleukin-23.

external link
24.

Tonel G et al. (2010) Cutting edge: A critical functional role for IL-23 in psoriasis.

external link
25.

et al. (2010) A genome-wide association study identifies new psoriasis susceptibility loci and an interaction between HLA-C and ERAP1.

external link
26.

Nestle FO et al. (2009) Psoriasis.

external link
27.

Li Y et al. (2009) Further genetic evidence for three psoriasis-risk genes: ADAM33, CDKAL1, and PTPN22.

external link
28.

Hollox EJ et al. (2008) Psoriasis is associated with increased beta-defensin genomic copy number.

external link
29.

Lande R et al. (2007) Plasmacytoid dendritic cells sense self-DNA coupled with antimicrobial peptide.

external link
30.

Conrad C et al. (2007) Alpha1beta1 integrin is crucial for accumulation of epidermal T cells and the development of psoriasis.

external link
31.

Krueger GG et al. (2007) A human interleukin-12/23 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of psoriasis.

external link
32.

Rosbotham JL et al. (1994) An association between psoriasis and hereditary multiple exostoses. A clue for the mapping of a psoriasis susceptibility gene?

external link
33.

Helms C et al. (2005) Localization of PSORS1 to a haplotype block harboring HLA-C and distinct from corneodesmosin and HCR.

external link
34.

Orrù S et al. (2005) Mapping of the major psoriasis-susceptibility locus (PSORS1) in a 70-Kb interval around the corneodesmosin gene (CDSN).

external link
35.

Elomaa O et al. (2004) Transgenic mouse models support HCR as an effector gene in the PSORS1 locus.

external link
36.

STEINBERG AG et al. (1951) A genetic and statistical study of psoriasis.

external link
37.

ABELE DC et al. (1963) HEREDITY AND PSORIASIS. STUDY OF A LARGE FAMILY.

external link
38.

WARD JH et al. (1961) Inheritance of psoriasis in a Utah kindred.

external link
39.

STEINBERG AG et al. (1952) A further note on the genetics of psoriasis.

external link
40.

Asumalahti K et al. (2003) Genetic analysis of PSORS1 distinguishes guttate psoriasis and palmoplantar pustulosis.

external link
41.

Gudjonsson JE et al. (2003) Psoriasis patients who are homozygous for the HLA-Cw*0602 allele have a 2.5-fold increased risk of developing psoriasis compared with Cw6 heterozygotes.

external link
42.

Nair RP et al. (1997) Evidence for two psoriasis susceptibility loci (HLA and 17q) and two novel candidate regions (16q and 20p) by genome-wide scan.

external link
43.

None (2003) The International Psoriasis Genetics Study: assessing linkage to 14 candidate susceptibility loci in a cohort of 942 affected sib pairs.

external link
44.

Veal CD et al. (2001) Identification of a novel psoriasis susceptibility locus at 1p and evidence of epistasis between PSORS1 and candidate loci.

external link
45.

Hüffmeier U et al. (2009) Characterisation of psoriasis susceptibility locus 6 (PSORS6) in patients with early onset psoriasis and evidence for interaction with PSORS1.

external link
46.

Caruso R et al. (2009) Involvement of interleukin-21 in the epidermal hyperplasia of psoriasis.

external link
47.

Matthews D et al. (1996) Evidence that a locus for familial psoriasis maps to chromosome 4q.

external link
48.

Zenz R et al. (2005) Psoriasis-like skin disease and arthritis caused by inducible epidermal deletion of Jun proteins.

external link
49.

Capon F et al. (1999) Evidence for interaction between psoriasis-susceptibility loci on chromosomes 6p21 and 1q21.

external link
50.

Enlund F et al. (1999) Analysis of three suggested psoriasis susceptibility loci in a large Swedish set of families: confirmation of linkage to chromosome 6p (HLA region), and to 17q, but not to 4q.

external link
51.

Park BS et al. (1999) Vitamin D receptor polymorphism is associated with psoriasis.

external link
52.

Jordan CT et al. (2012) Rare and common variants in CARD14, encoding an epidermal regulator of NF-kappaB, in psoriasis.

external link
53.

Zhang XJ et al. (2002) Evidence for a major psoriasis susceptibility locus at 6p21(PSORS1) and a novel candidate region at 4q31 by genome-wide scan in Chinese hans.

external link
54.

Sugiura K et al. (2013) The majority of generalized pustular psoriasis without psoriasis vulgaris is caused by deficiency of interleukin-36 receptor antagonist.

external link
55.

Setta-Kaffetzi N et al. (2013) Rare pathogenic variants in IL36RN underlie a spectrum of psoriasis-associated pustular phenotypes.

external link
56.

Marrakchi S et al. (2011) Interleukin-36-receptor antagonist deficiency and generalized pustular psoriasis.

external link
57.

Boyman O et al. (2004) Spontaneous development of psoriasis in a new animal model shows an essential role for resident T cells and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

external link
58.

Ghoreschi K et al. (2003) Interleukin-4 therapy of psoriasis induces Th2 responses and improves human autoimmune disease.

external link
59.

Nair RP et al. (2006) Sequence and haplotype analysis supports HLA-C as the psoriasis susceptibility 1 gene.

external link
60.

Asadullah K et al. (2001) Interleukin-10 promoter polymorphism in psoriasis.

external link
61.

Abrams JR et al. (1999) CTLA4Ig-mediated blockade of T-cell costimulation in patients with psoriasis vulgaris.

external link
62.

Sayegh MH et al. (1998) The role of T-cell costimulatory activation pathways in transplant rejection.

external link
63.

Farber EM et al. (1974) Natural history of psoriasis in 61 twin pairs.

external link
64.

Swanbeck G et al. (1994) A population genetic study of psoriasis.

external link
65.

Bata-Csorgo Z et al. (1995) Kinetics and regulation of human keratinocyte stem cell growth in short-term primary ex vivo culture. Cooperative growth factors from psoriatic lesional T lymphocytes stimulate proliferation among psoriatic uninvolved, but not normal, stem keratinocytes.

external link
66.

Tiilikainen A et al. (1980) Psoriasis and HLA-Cw6.

external link
67.

Burch PR et al. (1981) Mode of inheritance in psoriasis.

external link
68.

Pietrzyk JJ et al. (1982) Family studies in psoriasis. I. Complex segregation analysis.

external link
69.

Brandrup F et al. (1982) Psoriasis in monozygotic twins: variations in expression in individuals with identical genetic constitution.

external link
70.

Watson W et al. (1972) The genetics of psoriasis.

external link
71.

White SH et al. (1972) Disturbance of HL-A antigen frequency in Psoriasis.

external link
72.

Russell TJ et al. (1972) Histocompatibility (HL-A) antigens associated with psoriasis.

external link
73.

Reiser H et al. (1996) Costimulatory B7 molecules in the pathogenesis of infectious and autoimmune diseases.

external link
74.

Moll JM et al. (1973) Familial occurrence of psoriatic arthritis.

external link
75.

Beckman L et al. (1974) HL-A antigens, blood groups, serum groups and red cell enzyme thypes in psoriasis.

external link
76.

Kimberling W et al. (1973) The inheritance of psoriasis.

external link
77.

Burch PR et al. (1965) Psoriasis: aetiological aspects.

external link
78.

Propping P et al. (1985) Increased birth weight in psoriasis--another expression of a "thrifty genotype"?

external link
79.

Saiag P et al. (1985) Psoriatic fibroblasts induce hyperproliferation of normal keratinocytes in a skin equivalent model in vitro.

external link
80.

Suarez-Almazor ME et al. (1990) The genetics of psoriasis. Haplotype sharing in siblings with the disease.

external link
81.

None (1991) Somatic recombination may explain linear psoriasis.

external link
82.

Chang EY et al. (1992) T-cell activation is potentiated by cytokines released by lesional psoriatic, but not normal, epidermis.

external link
Update: 14. August 2020
Copyright © 2005-2020 Zentrum für Nephrologie und Stoffwechsel, Dr. Mato Nagel
Albert-Schweitzer-Ring 32, D-02943 Weißwasser, Deutschland, Tel.: +49-3576-287922, Fax: +49-3576-287944
Seitenüberblick | Webmail | Haftungsausschluss | Datenschutz