Molekulargenetisches Labor
Zentrum für Nephrologie und Stoffwechsel
Moldiag Erkrankungen Gene Support Kontakt

Suszeptibilität für Mykobakteriosen

Die genetisch bedingte Anfälligkeit gegenüber Mykobakteriosen ist durch Variationen im TIRAP-Gen determiniert.

Gliederung

Erbliche Infektionsanfälligkeiten
Aspergillose-Infektionsanfälligkeit
Familiäre Candidose
HIV-Resistenz
IRAK4-Mangel
Invasive Pneumokokken-Erkrankung
Masern-Infektanfälligkeit
Meningokokken-Infektanfälligkeit
Resistenz gegenüber Trypanosoma brucei
Septischer Schock
Störungen der mRNA-Editiertfunktion
Suszeptibilität für Bakteriämie 1
Suszeptibilität für Malaria
Suszeptibilität für Mykobakteriosen
TIRAP
X-chromosomale Suszeptibilität für Mykobakteriosen durch IKBKG-Defekt
IKBKG
Suszeptibilität für Pseudomonas-Infektionen
X-chromosomale Suszeptibilität für Mykobakteriosen durch IKBKG-Defekt

Referenzen:

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51.

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Update: 14. August 2020
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