Molekulargenetisches Labor
Zentrum für Nephrologie und Stoffwechsel

Rheumatoide Arthritis-Progression

Die Progression einer rheumatoiden Arthritis kann durch genetische Varianten im IL10-Gen, welches Interleukin 10 kodiert, vermittelt werden.

Gliederung

Autoinflammatorische Erkrankungen
Autoinflammation mit Arthritis und Dyskeratose
Autoinflammation, Antikörpermangel und Immundysregulations-Syndrom
Autoinflammatorisches periodisches Fieber mit Immundefizit und Thrombozytopenie
Cherubismus
Cryopyrin-assoziiertes periodisches Fieber-Syndrom
Familiäres Mittelmeerfieber
Familiäres kälteinduziertes autoinflammatorisches Syndrom
Hereditäre Behçet-ähnliche Krankheit des Kindes
Interleukin 1-Rezeptorantagonist-Mangel
Interleukin 10-Mangel
Interleukin 10-Rezeptor-Mangel
Kongenitale sideroblastische Anämie-B-Zell-Immundefekt-periodisches Fieber-Entwicklungsverzögerungs-Syndrom
Majeed-Syndrom
Mevalonat-Kinase assoziierte entzündliche Erkrankungen
Neigung zu maligner Hyperthermie 5
Periodisches Fieber mit Beginn im Kindesalter-Pannikulitis-Dermatose-Syndrom
Periodisches Fieber-infantile Enterocolitis-autoinflammatorisches Syndrom
Proteasom-assoziiertes Autoinflammations-Syndrom
Pyogene Arthritis - Pyoderma gangraenosum - Akne - Syndrom
Rheumatoide Arthritis-Progression
IL10
STING-assoziierte Vaskulopathie mit Beginn in der Kindheit
Systemische idiopathische juvenile Arthritis
TNF-Rezeptor-assoziiertes periodisches Fieber-Syndrom
Vaskulitis durch ADA2-Mangel
Veranlagung für entzündliche Darmerkrankungen

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73. Wikipedia DE (Rheumatoide_Arthritis) [^]
Update: 8. Mai 2019