Molekulargenetische Diagnostik
Praxis Dr. Mato Nagel

Rett-Syndrom

Das Rett-Syndrom ist eine x-chromosomal dominante Erkrankung des zentralen Nervensystem, die durch Mutationen im MECP2-Gen ausgelöst wird.

Gliederung

Erbliche Nervenerkrankungen
Alzheimer Erkrankung
Arts-Syndrom
Autismus
Autosomal dominante zerebelläre Ataxie mit Schwerhörigkeit und Narkolepsie
Autosomal rezessive spastische Paraplegie 44
Brunner-Syndrom
Charcot-Marie-Tooth-Hoffmann-Krankheit
Hereditäre benigne Chorea
Hereditäre distale Motorneuronen-Neuropathie Typ 5A
Hereditäre sensorisch-autonome Neuropathie Typ 2A
Hereditäre sensorische Neuropathie Typ 1E
Hirnmalformation mit Urogenitaldefekten
Hypokalämische periodische Paralyse 1
Hypomyelinisierte Leukodystrophy 2
Idiopathische Kalzifikation der Basalganglien 1
Inkludionskörpermyopathie 2
Kongenitale Schmerzunempfindlichkeit mit Anhidrose
Nemaline-Myopathy 5
Neonatale Enzephalopathie mit Mikrozephalie
Nonaka-Myopathie
Porenzephalie
Rett-Syndrom
Atypisches Rett-Syndrom
MECP2
MECP2
Rett-Syndrom Variante mit erhaltener Sprechfähigkeit
MECP2
Spastische Paraplegie 17 mit Amyotrophie der Hände und Füße
Syndrom der Intelligenzminderung mit stark verzögerter Sprachentwicklung und milden Dysmorphien
X-chromosomale syndromale mentale Retardierung 13
Zerebrale Mikroangiopathie mit Blutung

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2.

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