Molekulargenetische Diagnostik
Praxis Dr. Mato Nagel

Kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit gestörter LDL-Clearance

Die kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit gestörter LDL-Clearance beinhalted Fettstoffwechselstörungen, bei denen die Mutationen zu einer verzögerten Elimination von LDL aus dem Plasma führen.

Gliederung

Familiäre kombinierte Hyperlipämie
Kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit Dysfunktion des Fettgewebes
Kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit VLDL-Überproduktion
Kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit gestörtem VLDL-Metabolismus
Kombinierte familiäre Hyperlipämie mit gestörter LDL-Clearance
ATF6
LDLR
PCSK9

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