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Wachstumshormon-Überempfindlichkeit

Die Überempfindlichkeit gegenüber Wachstumshormon außert sich in einem vermehrten Ansprechen des Wachstumshormon-Rezeptors gegenüber dem Hormon was damit zu einem verstärkten Wachstum führt. Bisher ist nur eine Variation, die Deletion bzw. Nicht-Transkription des Exon 3 führt als Ursache einer solchen Störung bekannt.

Gliederung

Störungen der Regulation des Wachstums
ADAMTSL3
Kombinierter Hypophysenhormon-Mangel
Wachstumshormon-Mangel
Wachstumshormon-Unempfindlichkeit
Wachstumshormon-Überempfindlichkeit
GHR

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OMIM.ORG article

Omim 600946 external link
Update: 14. August 2020
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