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Hypercholesterinämie

Die Hypercholesterinämie ist eine Fettstoffwechselstörung mit überwiegend erhöhtem Cholesterin.

Gliederung

Hyperlipämie
Chylomikronämie
Familiäre kombinierte Hyperlipämie
Hypercholesterinämie
Autosomal dominante Hypercholesterinämie 1
LDLR
Autosomal dominante Hypercholesterinämie 2
APOB
Autosomal dominante Hypercholesterinämie 3
PCSK9
Autosomal rezessive Hypercholesterinämie
LDLRAP1
Lp(a) Hyperlipoproteinämie
LPA
Veranlagung für hohes LDL-Cholesterin
HMGCR
Hypertriglyceridämie
Mangel an lysosomaler saurer Lipase

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OMIM.ORG article

Omim 143890 [^]
Update: 10. Mai 2019
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