Molekulargenetische Diagnostik
Praxis Dr. Mato Nagel

Aniridie-Wilms-Tumor-Syndrom

Das Aniridie-Wilms-Tumor-Syndrom ist eine autosomal dominante Erkrankung, die durch Mikrodeletionen der benachbarten PAX6- und WT1-Gene hervorgerufen wird.

Gliederung

Wilms-Tumor
Aniridie-Wilms-Tumor-Syndrom
PAX6
WT1
Denys-Drash-Syndrom
Somatisches Nephroblastom
WAGR-Syndrom

Referenzen:

1.

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2.

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3.

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9.

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10.

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11.

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35.

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36.

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37.

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38.

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41.

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44.

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45.

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46.

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47.

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48.

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49.

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50.

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51.

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52.

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53.

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54.

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55.

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56.

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57.

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58.

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59.

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